superchunk hooded cowl

I bike or walk to work, and on recent winter mornings, my internal monologue has been going something like this:

It’s so cold, I should’ve worn a hat, but that would flatten my hair. A hood could work, but wearing a hood with a scarf would be too much going on in the neck and head region, not to mention more things to keep track of.

Did I turn the coffee pot off?

Oh, I know! I could really benefit from a hood and scarf combo that would keep my ears nice and warm while loose enough to not flatten my hair. Oh man, it’s so cold, I regret everything.

Thus, I present to you: The Superchunk Hooded Cowl.

IMG_7646

Selfie stick for the win. Ugh, I’m such a millennial sometimes.

Superchunk Hooded Cowl Pattern

dimensions

Materials needed:

  • super bulky yarn, about 450 yards (I used 3 1/2 skeins of Isaac Mizrahi Craft in Roosevelt)
  • 9mm crochet hook
  • large tapestry needle
  • stitch markers

Stitches & abbreviations:

  • ch = chain
  • sl st = slip st
  • sc = single crochet
  • esc = extended sc (Insert hook into st, yarn over, pull loop through. You should have 2 loops on the hook. Yo and pull through only 1 loop on the hook, yo and pull through both loops.) Look for tutorials on YouTube and the World Wide Web.
  • hdc = half double crochet
  • sk = skip

Row 1: Foundation sc 20…or ch 21 and sc in the second ch from hook and each ch across (20).

Rows 2-50: Turn work, ch 2 (does not count as a st), hdc in back-loop only all the way across (20).

Place the first and last rows together. Ch 1 then sl st the two rows together (you should have 20 sl st).

You will have a tube/circle with a top and bottom edge now. Place the bottom and top edges together by folding the bottom to meet the top all the way around (like a turtle neck collar). Make sure the edges are aligned evenly because you will be sc’ing through both sides. I recommend using stitch markers/holders to keep the two sides even as you work. Make sure the sl st used to join the first and last rows are hidden on the inside of the work.

Edit: I have added the following two photos with yarn in a different color, to clarify what I mean by folding the work to place the bottom and top edges together. I hope this helps.

clarification2clarificationWorking in the round now (do not turn work)…

Round 1: Ch 1 and sc evenly all the way around, going through both edges/sides. I had 88 sc stitches. It is okay if you have a few stitches more or less than me, as long as it is an even number. Sl st into the first sc to join the round.

st markersRound 2: Ch 3 (counts as an esc and ch 1 space). *Sk next st, esc into the next st, ch 1* repeat to end. Sl st into the ch 2 of the beginning ch 3. I  had 44 esc and ch 1 spaces.

Rounds 3-31: Ch 3, esc into the first esc from the previous round, ch 1, *sk ch 1 space and esc into the next esc from the previous round, ch 1* repeat to the end. Sl st into the ch 2 of the beginning ch 3 (44 esc)

space markers

Rnd 32: Ch 1, sc around in each ch 1 space and esc (89). Join the round, fasten off and weave in all the ends.

So…maybe it’s really not that cold and my blood has thinned-out considerably since living in Phoenix. Do I look silly wearing such a thick item in the desert?

desert cowl

<<<go back home

Advertisements

9 responses to “superchunk hooded cowl

  1. I don’t have an 9mm hook handy, so i am using an 8mm. Do you think it will make much of a difference? I am crocheting rather loosely to compensate the size.

    Like

    • Hi Sabina, the cowl is pretty large and loose so I imagine that should be fine. You can also check your stitches to the gauge to see if it will be significantly different, then add more chains to the foundation to adjust as needed. There is a photo available that lists the gauge and measurements of the cowl. Hope you have fun with this! Happy crocheting 🙂

      Like

  2. Been looking for one of these for a long time since my got stolen I’m going to try and may one good luck to me

    Like

  3. Pingback: OPP: Other people’s products |·

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s